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A Year-by-Year Look at the Iowa/Penn State Dual Rivalry Since Sanderson’s Arrival

Sanderson_Cael

photo courtesy of Richard Immel

Tonight is the night we’ve all had circled since Iowa and Penn State released their schedules in the offseason. Will a revamped Iowa team be able to stop the magical run of Cael Sanderson’s Nittany Lions? Iowa comes into this match with a perfect 8-0 record and has steamrolled its competition this year. Only #4 Ohio State has managed to post ten team points against the Hawkeyes. All ten of Iowa’s starters are currently ranked in the top six and Tom Brands’ crew has a commanding lead in current tournament rankings. On the other hand, Penn State comes into this match banged up and have had their 60-match dual winning streak stopped by Arizona State earlier this season. 2019 NCAA champion Anthony Cassar has been lost for the year, due to injury, and 157 lbs Brady Berge, expected to be a contender, has only competed once this season. All that being said, duals are different. Penn State matches up with Iowa better than any team in the nation and is still very dangerous. Combined, both sides feature three #1 ranked wrestlers and eight wrestlers ranked within the top-three of their respective weight classes. 

In preparation for this mega-dual, we’ve decided to look back at these two school’s history since Sanderson took the reigns for the 2009-10 season. Surprisingly enough, in five of their eight meetings, the lower-ranked team has won. Also, neither school has won more than two-in-a-row. The first piece of history favors Penn State, while the second leans towards Iowa. Before you get settled in ready to watch the biggest dual of the year, here are some of the significant notes and matches that took place the last eight times that these squads have faced off. 

2009-10

#1 Iowa 29 #13 Penn State 6

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